Porcelain Bowl

$395.00

The ship sank February 6, 1822 in an area of the South China Sea known as the Belvidere Shoals.

After a month at sea, Tek Sing’s captain, Lo Tauko made the fateful decision to attempt a shortcut through the Gaspar Strait. Tek Sing ran aground on a reef and sank in about 100 feet of water.

In addition to a crew of 200, the Tek Sing was carrying approximately 1,600 passengers. Ships passing the debris of the wreck managed to rescue only 200 survivors. The great loss of life resulting with this wreck has dubbed it the “Titanic of the East”.

On May 12, 1999, British marine salvor Michael Hatcher discovered the wreck of the Tek Sing. The Tek Sing has yielded the largest and most spectacular haul of antique Chinese porcelain ever salvaged- 350,000 pieces!

One of the predominant patterns in the cargo are in the form of a bloom and each petal encloses a lingzhi-fungus, peach or flower-head, symbols of longevity.

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Product Description

The ship sank February 6, 1822 in an area of the South China Sea known as the Belvidere Shoals.

After a month at sea, Tek Sing’s captain, Lo Tauko made the fateful decision to attempt a shortcut through the Gaspar Strait. Tek Sing ran aground on a reef and sank in about 100 feet of water.

In addition to a crew of 200, the Tek Sing was carrying approximately 1,600 passengers. Ships passing the debris of the wreck managed to rescue only 200 survivors. The great loss of life resulting with this wreck has dubbed it the “Titanic of the East”.

On May 12, 1999, British marine salvor Michael Hatcher discovered the wreck of the Tek Sing. The Tek Sing has yielded the largest and most spectacular haul of antique Chinese porcelain ever salvaged- 350,000 pieces!

One of the predominant patterns in the cargo are in the form of a bloom and each petal encloses a lingzhi-fungus, peach or flower-head, symbols of longevity.

Additional Information

Origin

South China Sea