Denmark: Bronze Age gold spirals unearthed in field

BBC NEWS – News from Elsewhere | | July 9, 2015

The spirals were covered in soil when they were found, but polished up nicely
The spirals were covered in soil when they were found, but polished up nicely

Archaeologists are mystified by nearly 2,000 tiny golden spirals dug up in a field in eastern Denmark.

The coils, made from thin filaments about 3cm (1in) long, date from between 900BC and 700BC, according to Flemming Kaul of the National Museum in Copenhagen. But he and his colleagues aren’t quite sure what they have found. “The fact is we don’t know what they were for, although I’m inclined to think they were part of a priest-king’s robes, perhaps a fringe on a head-piece or parasol, or maybe woven into cloth,” he says on the museum’s website. The gold spirals will go on display at Skaelskor City Museum next week.

They were unearthed in the Boeslunde area, a rich source of Bronze Age gold artefacts. Several gold cups and rings have been found there in the past 200 years. Remnants of a fur-lined box uncovered nearby suggest the coils were cult objects from the time when the Danes’ ancestors worshipped the Sun, according to West Zealand Museum archaeologist Kirsten Christiansen. She is conducting further digs in the area, in case there’s more treasure lying beneath the soil.

We are open for business beginning Monday, June 1st under the following guidelines.

 Monday’s the gallery is open 10am – 4pm

Tuesday's - Thursday's - By appointment only

Friday’s the gallery is open 10am – 4pm

We are available to answer your calls and emails Monday-Friday 10 am to 5 pm.

  • YOU MUST WEAR A MASK TO ENTER – we will be wearing masks
  • NO GROUPS of people will be admitted
  • While in the gallery please maintain SOCIAL DISTANCING GUIDELINES
  • If we are busy with other customers you will be asked to wait outside

No public restroom available

These guidelines will remain in effect until further notice, STAY SAFE!